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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
different view. this fiscal cliff is a grander issue than just the united states. the drag in the u.s. is a big import to the rest of the world. stock markets are supposed to be leading economic indicators. if you look at the markets around the world from the last several weeks to months, the markets seem to be indicating just the opposite. they seem to be indicating that a deal will get done. what kind of deal whether it's one stage or two stage, nobody knows. but the fact of the matter is the equity markets tend to look three to six months out. they're giving good signs around the world. in europe, asia, emerging markets and here in the u.s. what i'd be doing is sitting on a well structured portfolio regardless of what the economic outcome is. well diversified across markets, across countries. some emerging large caps. most importantly dividend growers. i'll have a bit of exception with your last guest. i think this is a much more global story. i think a lot of backdrop in europe and china has some improving trends in it that are behind this. >> if the market is such a great predict
? >> absolutely it does, bill. and it has the last two months. we've seen a marked retreat from u.s.-based investments after u.s. centric holdings, the s&p 500 showing strong leadership in the first ten months of the year. what we've reason seen is now foreign markets picking up the slack. so i would say when we look into 2013, the opportunities most likely exist outside the united states, not in the u.s. >> outside of the united states is a large geographic area. can you narrow it down for us? like asia, europe, emerging frontier, what is it? >> of course, mandy. and that's part of the asset selection you have to do. for us one of the best areas we've seen has been in emerging market debt. it started out many years ago with the bricks and recently we've moved in the last five or six years to the n-11. by looking at those markets where we can have sovereign debt and corporate debt and relying on a good fund like the fidelity emerger. >> peter, i'm interested in what is going to be the key driver of the markets overall. i'm kind of sick of politics being the driver. right? because it
months. number one, the reexpansion that's going on overseas and what that will do for u.s. exports and u.s. firms, but number two, the uncertainty that small businesses in particular face and their reluctance to expand. on the one hand we think it's a little better growth than we've seen, but we think the uncertainties that smaller businesses in particular face is going to keep a lid on growth, and so what we see is an extension of the rather slow-growth environment had a we've seen that will help propel equity prices higher but not dramatically over the next year or two. >> bob pisani likened the fiscal cliff to y2k, and it is to a certain degree, at least in terms of decision and hiring and that kind of thing, it's creating some kind of paralysis. you talked to the traders here on the floor of the stock exchange. is it creating paralysis for them as well? they are not making any big bets until they know what happened. >> y2k created a lot of talk but didn't have impact on the stock market. i was here for that. the fiscal cliff has more impact, and it did today. i watched what the markets
ten years is all about energy here and what that does for u.s. manufacturing. technology, mobility, u.s. manufacturing and energy, that's exciting stuff. international, we think it's really looking inexpensive, especially emerging markets. >> all right. got to leave it there, gentlemen. real exciting stuff. appreciate your time and we'll see you soon. thank you guys. >> thanks, maria. software-maker adobe out with the fourth-quarter members. jon fortt outside adobe headquarters. over to you. >> reporter: hey, maria. looks like adobe has a beat on the top and bottom lines which might be seen as a bit of a surprise. it looked like the street was looking for 1.1 billion. adobe turns in 1.15. i was looking for around 56 cents in -- in proformo eps, and we've got 61 cents, i believe. now, what's particularly -- yeah, 61 cents non-gap. what's particularly important about that is adobe is adding creative cloud subscriptions at a really fast clip, around 10,000 a week. that's up from 8,000 the quarter before. that has some negative impact on revenue because they are not getting that big pop in
potential in the u.s. their growth is coming from other countries. right now they're operating, believe it or not, in 51 countries outside the u.s. they have about 30 million paying subscribers. they don't have enough content. the content that they've just acquired the rights to through disney is a real show stopper. it puts them miles ahead of the competition. amazon, hbo go, hulu, which disney owns a part of. >> julia, what's your take on this? >> the interesting thing, maria -- >> maria -- >> wait a second, julia. i'm sorry. what were you saying, porter? >> the interesting thing about this transaction is no price or terms were mentioned. the deal could actually be pretty close to the market cap of netflix, which is $4.8 billion today. >> i see. julia, go ahead. >> maria, i think a key thing to point out here is that netflix is now getting movie content in the same window as premium cable chabls used to get it. we're talking about hbo, showtime, stars. those were the three channels that had exclusive access to premium movies seven to nine months after they were in theaters. now that's
of the year. we have so much uncertainty in washington. we do have slowing economies in europe and in the u.s. >> right. david, what do you say right now? break the tie for us. >> break the tie. in the near term, there's an epic tug of war between extremely aggressive monetary easing and just total disdain for what they're doing in washington on tax and regulatory policy. in the near term, the fiscal cliff prevails. in the longer term, the fed will prevail. there's so much mistrust on stocks that i think that still can be a positive catalyst for stocks relative to traditional bonds over the next 12 months. >> i'm going to push back a little bit on that. >> i'm going to break the tie in ralph's favor. >> david, i want to push back a little bit on that. in terms of -- like, is the fed really that much of a factor these days now in terms of keeping the market afloat? >> absolutely. >> it's not losing its bang for its buck? >> it's not as powerful as it was in the fall of 2008 or even 2010, but when you consider that, u.s., long bonds, 1.5%. short-term interest rates, zero. negative on an inflati
believe are in the u.s. big -- cap with big brand names with great fundamentals, and they are right here in the u.s.? make that the last word. the bell is ringing. maria will pick up the second half of the "closing bell" in just a moment. >>> and it is 4:00 on wall street. do you know where your money is? hi, everybody, welcome back to the "closing bell." i'm maria bartiromo on the floor of the new york stock exchange. today fading optimism about a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff weighed on stocks. here's how we're finishing on wall street close to the lows of the day with a decline of the dow jones industrial average of 98 points at 13,252. once again we saw both sides digging n.no deal on the fiscal cliff in washington and stocks sold out. nasdaq composite off a third of a percent and the s&p 500 down 11 points, and the countdown continues. only seven trading days left until the fiscal cliff dead livent was today the beginning of a bigger selloff if a deal does not come soon? joining me right now is a cnbc contributor from western destination and steven hammers from the emp fund and our
place to be once they settle this thing. the third and the most important thing is the u.s. economy is the most vibrant, adaptable, innovative and creative economy on the planet. i think that means we're coming out and starting to see that in many sectors today. we're bullish and think you need to look at this on a positive frame. >> maria, i'm less bullish than that. that sounds very optimistic. i would love to believe that, but if you compare valuations of equities versus bonds, yes, there's a huge spread right now, but that doesn't necessarily make equities really cheap. it's just a relative trade. i think, also, yes, we're a vibrant economy. we certainly are a strong economy. i think it's really unsustainable, the level of debt that we have in this country. we have $1 trillion in debt. i heard an incredibly succinct way of describing this. rick santelli actually said it this morning about how you can't say you're cutting $800 billion when really $80 billion is really from wars that are just going away. that's not really a cut. that's taking away the addition. i think you need to
dart pools in the u.s. operating alongside 13 public exchanges. the concern, there's a potential disadvantage to the overall markets and, of course, retail investors. maria? >> that. ton, thank you so much. >>> as the debate continues on capitol hill, back on wall street, seth marin argues that high-frequency trading benefits the few at the extension of many and is taking a toll on investor confidence and seth joins me right now along with special guest host ken langone. you're very critical of high-frequency trading saying it benefits the few at the expense of many. why in. >> that's correct. you have a very few number of constituents, and this is very much of a zero sum game, and they make their money at the expense of all of those folks who are investors who invest in the mutual funds and the pension funds, and the most important thing that we need to reinstill in this country is investor confidence. >> yeah. >> unfortunately, all of the major blow ups, recently the flash crash, facebook or the knight fiasco are interrelated with high-frequency trading. >> that's a good point
. mary thompson is at the big doi. the dow staged and pulled lower today by u.s. senator harry reid and the idea that the markets would send the markets higher in late trading and even though the gains latt in the kay were trimmed. mitch wok nell tock to the fleb vp strategy. the weaker performers were financial, materials as well as utilities among the sectors offsetting late-day games we saw in discretionary and staple stocks low on initial consumer sentiment and the cliff. home builders today finished something very good. november home sales for strong continue once again. of course, now all eyes to this weekend to see what hang will done about the cliff. back to you. >> if, at all. thank you, mary. housing is clicking on all cylinders right now. home prices up nearly 7 boston this year making it the first yearly gain we've seen in housing six 2006. that's unbelievable. >> it is unbelievable. >> look the november numbers. 14.5% jump in existing home sales. mary mentioned the 15% increase in new home sales. mortgage rates still close to all-time lows right now. >> with all that po
first failing. we won't go over the cliff and stay there. it won't be a blow to the u.s. economy at all, in my judgment, and the economy is going to move on through this. >> can you invest in the markets today without considering the fiscal cliff? >> yes. >> is there a strategy to go forward. >> i just tried to ortic lays and saying to yourself it won't ind mine the economy so i'm going to v.on the fundamentals, growth, competitiveness and earnings and so forth depending on the situation. i think investors would be wise to look beyond the fiscal cliff because all the fears it's tomorrow doing the economy are misplaced. >> most economists have said if we go into 2013 without a deal we'll go into recession. >> we might have into 2013 for three days or knife days or a week before there's a deal. that's about it. the pressure from financial markets will be too great so the scenario that you just referred to to, we go over the cliff, had and the economy sinks. i want to emphasize that cannot happen. >> let me move on to another topic. timothy geithner has said he's not returning for another
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the numbers. the u.s. has around 5 million millionaires with a total net worth of $18.8 trillion according to insight in london. if we go off the cliff, next year the population of millionaires would drop by 315,000. their fortunes would drop by $240 billion. if we get a deal but it's bad for the economy, the millionaire population would drop by 26,000 millionaires. if we get a deal and it's good for the economy, millionaires would grow by 230,000 and their fortunes would soar by $1 trillion. yo under score the cost of the cliff, if no threat of a cliff at all, the number of millionaires would grow by 443,000, a 9% increase. the difference between no cliff and going over the cliff is more than 750,000 millionaires, or about $1.3 trillion in worth, the gdp of canada. i'm looking at the impact of economic growth on millionaires, not attacks which could reduce that growth but a cliff deal alone could be worth $1 trillion in new wealth and new millionaires. another reason why the folks in washington should keep on talking. >> really interesting stuff. so, while we have you, robert, let's talk
is constrained. i'm hearing booking is returning to normal after sandy, after a hit for them. those stocks up. u.s. airways up. southwest has been on fire recently. finally, the insurers. first down day in a long time. in the last couple weeks, generally all of them have been to the up side. this is the first down day in about two weeks. back to you. >> thank you so much, bob. >>> watch out for year end window dressing. we're not talking about the lovely holiday displays. we're talking about what some money managers do to their portfolios to drum up better returns. >>> then -- >> we relied on audited financials. not exactly brand x accounting firm. >> hewlett-packard ceo meg whitman putting d, liotte in the line of fire. the ceo will sit down with us. >>> finds out from the ceo of ppr about what he's expecting for christmas. you're watching "the closing bell" on cnbc, first in business worldwide. if we want to improve our schools... ... what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like invest
, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. he's going to apply testosterone to his underarm. axiron, the only underarm treatment for low t, can restore testosterone levels back to normal in most men. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18. axiron can transfer to others through direct contact. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these signs and symptoms to your doctor if they occur. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. do not use if you have prostate or breast cancer. serious side effects could include increased
economic landscape. i mean, you know that the u.s. economy is doing better. we know there will be a solution. it might take a little more time. i'm not going lore a grand bargain next week nor am i looking for the collapse of any negotiations, but i think there will always be a compromise and with a comp mooig mice comes opportunity. >> it's amazing to me, though, that this is taking so much time. dean, do you think we've seen an impact to the economy going into 2013 as a result of anticipation and inability on the part of or r on the part of business executives to put plans in place, hire new folks because they don't know what their tax rates are going to be, they don't know what's happening in washington? has it already taken an impact? >> i think that's fair to say. we have seen capital spending be weaker than it would have been otherwise if there hadn't been these worries about the fiscal cliff. i think that the worry, though, that the economy was going to tank in the second half of the year, something like 1% that many people were expecting, that's proving not t
u.s. mint director. do you have any -- any feeling, any sort of inside feeling, if you like, about what's going on over there? >> yeah, you know, i've been there before, and can i say that all the parties truly wanted to come to some type of resolution, but they have kicked the can down the road so many times it's all the solutions that are left are extremely difficult ones with huge political and economic negative consequences, so from my perspective they are having so much difficulty trying to come to agreement. i'm shaving a little bit off of this year's deficit. we're going to have fiscal problems for as far as the eye can see, an here's where an investor, a smart investor is going to want to diversify, especially into things like tangible assets like gold. >> you're going to make the case for gold here, which, you know, has had a heck of a run for the last decade or so, but it has started to show signs of wear and tear. what would propel gold from here necessarily? >> well, two things that i would have your viewers take a look at. the first is the reason why gold has kind of f
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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